Boehmeria cylindrica-False Nettle, Etc.

Boehmeria cylindrica (False Nettle, Etc.) on 9-18-19, #634-5.

False Nettle, Small-Spiked False, Nettle Bog Hemp

Boehmeria cylindrica

boh-MEER-ee-uh  sil-IN-dree-kuh

Synonyms of Boehmeria cylindrica (35) (Updated on 5-4-21 from Plants of the World Online): Boehmeria atrovirens Gand., Boehmeria austrina Small, Boehmeria cylindrica var. brachystachys Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica f. cuneata F.Seym., Boehmeria cylindrica var. drummondiana (Wedd.) Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica var. elatior Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica subvar. gymnostachya Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica var. littoralis (Sw.) Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica var. phyllostachya (Miq.) Wedd., Boehmeria cylindrica var. scabra Porter, Boehmeria cylindrica subvar. tomentosa Wedd., Boehmeria dasypoda Miq., Boehmeria decurrens Small, Boehmeria drummondiana Wedd., Boehmeria elongata Blume, Boehmeria florida Miq., Boehmeria lateriflora Muhl. ex Willd., Boehmeria littoralis Sw., Boehmeria longifolia Gand., Boehmeria phyllostachya Miq., Boehmeria phyllostachya f. glabrior Miq., Boehmeria scabra (Porter) Small, Duretia cylindrica Gaudich., Duretia palustris Gaudich., Procris lateriflora Poir., Procris littoralis Poir., Ramium cylindricum Kuntze, Ramium elongatum Kuntze, Urtica capitata L., Urtica capitata Schwein. ex Blume, Urtica cylindrica L., Urtica distachya Spreng., Urtica filiformis Walter, Urtica mariana Mill., Urtica palustris Juss. ex Pers.

Boehmeria cylindrica (L.) Sw. is the correct and accepted scientific name for this species of Boehmeria. It was named and described as such by Olof Peter Swartz in Nova Genera & Species Plantarum in 1788. It was first named and described as Urtica cylindrica by Carl von Linnaeus in the second edition of Species Plantarum in 1753.

The genus, Boehmeria Jacq., was named and described by Nicolaus Joseph von Jacquin in Enumeratio Systematica Plantarum in 1760.

Plants of the World Online by Kew lists 52 species in the Boehmeria genus (as of 5-4-21 when I last updated this page). It is a member of the plant family Urticaceae with 57 genera. Those numbers could change as updates are made (and likely will).

Distribution map of Boehmeria cylindrica from Plants of the World Online. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/. Retrieved 1-18-20.

The Boehmeria cylindrica is native to much of North and South America. The above map from Plants of the World Online shows where it is native in green and purple where it was introduced. The map on the USDA Plants Database for the United States and Canada is the same except it also includes California. The map on iNaturalist shows where its members have made observations throughout the world. The species could also have a wider range than what the maps show 

THERE ARE SEVERAL LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE FOR FURTHER READING AND BETTER POSITIVE  ID.

Boehmeria cylindrica, upper leaf surface, on 9-18-19, #634-6.

I have encountered the Boehmeria cylindrica throughout my life but really never paid much attention to it. I decided to ID the wildflowers on the farm, and although this species would generally be considered a weed, I suppose it is still a wildflower.

The Boehmeria cylindrica is a nettle without the sting. Its serrated leaves are broad tapering to a point and are covered with very tiny hairs giving them kind of a rough texture. As you can tell in the above photo, there is a prominent central vein and two lateral veins coming from the base of the leaf. Leaves are connected to the plant’s main stem by long petioles. You could say “leaf stems” but you need to learn the correct terminology. 🙂 So, you would say these leaves are broadly ovate, lanceolate, broadly elliptic, petiolate, etc… They taper at the tip and are somewhat angled.

Boehmeria cylindrica, the underside of a leaf, on 9-18-19, #634-7.

The leaf undersides are a lighter color, kind of chalky looking, because of the fine hair (pubescent).

Boehmeria cylindrica on 9-18-19, #634-8.

Leaves usually grow in opposite pairs from leaf nodes along the stems. These plant’s stems can be roundish or 4-angled and can be either smooth or kind of fuzzy (glabrous or slightly pubescent).

Boehmeria cylindrica on 9-18-19, #634-9.

The inflorescence on the Boehmeria cylindrica are weird and easily recognized. I doubt there are any other plants you could mistake this plant for especially when you consider the other features. The inflorescence consists of small, green to greenish-white, dense flower clusters on short or fairly long spikes. Information online says plants can be dioecious or monoecious which means they can have male or female parts in the same flowers or separate flowers. Some websites say they are mainly one or the other depending on the site.

Flowers have no scent to they are pollinated by the wind…

Boehmeria cylindrica on 9-18-19, #634-10.

Since this nettle is stingless, they are visited by deer and cattle on occasion. Several caterpillars species feed on Boehmeria cylindrica.

Boehmeria cylindrica on 9-18-19, #634-11.

This species prefers growing in a shadier area in moist and fertile soil. Plants growing in more sun will have a yellowish color. The above photos were taken in the back of the farm by the pond where they grow in abundance. They are also growing in several other shady areas.

I have enjoyed photographing and learning about the many wildflowers growing on the farm and other areas. My farm is in Windsor, Missouri in Pettis County (Henry County is across the street and Benton and Johnson aren’t far away). I have grown over 500 different plants and identified over 100 species of wildflowers (most have pages listed on the right side of the page). I am not an expert, botanist, or horticulturalist. I just like growing, photographing, and writing about my experience. I rely on several websites for ID and a few horticulturalists I contact if I cannot figure them out. Wildflowers can be somewhat variable from location to location, so sometimes it gets a bit confusing. If you see I have made an error, please let me know so I can correct what I have written.

I hope you found this page useful and be sure to check the links below for more information. They were written by experts and provide much more information. Some sites may not be up-to-date but they are always a work in progress. If you can, I would appreciate it if you would click on the “Like” below and leave a comment. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. You can also send an email to me at thebelmontrooster@yahoo.com. I would enjoy hearing from you especially if you notice something is a bit whacky.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
INTERNATIONAL PLANT NAMES INDEX (GENUS/SPECIES)
TROPICOS (GENUS/SPECIES)
FLORA OF NORTH AMERICA (GENUS/SPECIES)

WORLD FLORA ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WIKIPEDIA (GENUS/SPECIES)
DAVE’S GARDEN
MISSOURI PLANTS
iNATURALIST.ORG
WILDFLOWERSEARCH.ORG
USDA PLANTS DATABASE
ILLINOIS WILDFLOWERS
MINNESOTA WILDFLOWERS
LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER
KANSAS WILDFLOWERS AND GRASSES
PFAF (PLANTS FOR A FUTURE)
FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY
GO BOTANY
NEW YORK FLORA ATLAS
ALABAMA PLANT ATLAS
FLORAFINDER.ORG

NOTE: The figures may not match on these websites. It depends on when and how they make updates and when their sources make updates (and if they update their sources or even read what they say). Some websites have hundreds and even many thousands of species to keep up with. Accepted scientific names change periodically and it can be hard to keep with as well. In my opinion, Plants of the World Online by Kew is the most reliable and up-to-date plant database and they make updates on a regular basis. I make updates at least once a year and when I write new pages but I do get behind. We are all a work in progress. 🙂

 

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