Lamprocapnos spectabilis (Syn. Dicentra spectabilis)-Bleeding Heart

Lamprocapnos spectabilis (Bleeding Heart) on 5-1-09, #12-29.

Bleeding Heart, Lyre Flower, Lady-In-A-Bath, etc.

Lamprocapnos spectabilis

lam-pro-KAP-nos speck-TAB-ih-liss

Syn:

Dicentra spectabilis

dy-SEN-truh speck-TAB-ih-liss

RHS AWARD OF GARDEN MERIT

I bought my Bleeding Heart from Lowe’s in Greenville, Mississippi in 2009 while living at the mansion in Leland. I transplanted it in a bed I made by the old goldfish pool in the backyard then moved it to a new bed close to the entrance of the den. I moved a concrete slab for a fountain to that spot in 2010 and missed covering up the Bleeding Heart by an inch. I didn’t realize it until it returned in the spring of 2011. I don’t remember if it returned in 2012 or not. I know I took more photos but somehow there is only one in this plants photo folder. The other photos must be on the old laptop I can’t get to come on.

Lamprocapnos spectabilis (L.) Fukuhara. It was named and described as such by Tatsundo Fukuhara in Plant Systematics and Evolution in 1997.

It was first named Fumaria spectabilis L. by Carl von Linnaeus in Species Plantarum in 1753.

<<<<HISTORY OF NAMES>>>>

This species of Bleeding Heart had had several names using Fumaria spectabilis L. as the basionym:

Fumaria spectabilis L.-Named and described by Carl von Linnaeus in Species Plantarum in 1753. The genus, Fumaria Tourn. ex. L. was described by Linnaeus in Species Plantarum in 1753 but he didn’t originally name the genus. I think Joseph Pitton de Tournefort named the genus as he did many before Linnaeus published their names in 1753. The Fumaria genus is still an accepted genus which includes 57 accepted species.

Capnorchis spectabilis (L.) Borkh.-Named and described by Moritz (Moriz) Balthasar Borkhausen in Archiv für die Botanik in 1797. He named and described the Capnorchis genus in the same publication. The genus is now synonym of Dicentra.

Corydalis spectabilis (L.) Pers.-Named and described by Christiaan Hendrik Persoon in Synopsis Plantarum in 1806. The genus, Corydalis DC., was named and described by Augustin Pyramus de Candolle in Flore Francaise in 1805. The genus Corydalis now contains 588 accepted species.

Diclytra spectabilis (L.) DC.-Named and described by Augustin Pyramus de Candolle in Regni Vegetabilis Systema Naturale in 1821. The genus, Diclytra Borkh., was named and described by Moritz (Moriz) Balthasar Borkhausen in Archiv für die Botanik in 1797. This genus is now a synonym of Dicentra.

Dielytra spectabilis (L.) DC.-Named and described by Augustin Pyramus de Candolle in Regni Vegetabilis Systema Naturale in 1821. He named and described the same plant with two different names in this publication. The genus, Dielytra Cham. & Schltdl., was named and described by Ludolf Karl Adelbert von Chamisso and Diederich Franz Leonhard von Schlechtendal in Linnaea in 1826. This genus is now a synonym of Dicentra.

Dielytra spectabilis (L.) G. Don-Named and described by George Don in A General History of the Dichlamydeous Plants in 1831. Mr. Don documented this plant using the name given by Mr. Candolle in 1821 using his own name. Hmmm…

Eucapnos spectabilis (L.) Siebold & Zucc.-Named and described by Philipp Franz (Balthasar) von Siebold and Joseph Gerhard Zuccarini in Abhandlungen der Mathematisch in 1843. The genus, Eucapnos Bernh., was named and described by Johann Jakob Bernhardi in Linnaea in 1833. The genus is now a synonym of Dicentra.

Dicentra spectabilis (L.) Lem.-Named and described by (Antoine) Charles Lemaire in Flora des Serres in 1847. The genus, Dicentra Barkh. ex Bernh., was named and described by Johann Jakob Bernhardi in Linnaea in 1833. Barkh. named the genus first but was not accepted. Plants of the World Online currently lists 8 accepted species in this genus although Dicentra spectabilis is now a synonym of Lamprocapnos spectabilis.

Hedycapnos spectabilis (L.) Planch.-Named and described by Jules Émile Planchon in Flora des Serres et des Jardins de Europe in 1853. The genus, Hedycapnos Planch., was named and described by Planchon in the same publication. This genus is now a synonym of Dicentra.

Lamprocapnos spectabilis (L.) Fukuhara-Named and described by Tatsundo Fukuhara in Plant Systematics and Evolution in 1997. The genus, Lamprocapnos Endl., was named and described by Stephan Friedrich Ladislaus Endlicher in Genera Plantarum in 1850. I read where the name change wasn’t actually approved until 2006.

That’s weird… The Lamprocapnos genus was named in 1850 but this species wasn’t in this genus until 1997 after it was put in and out of other genera for so many years. Oh, yeah, it is the ONLY species in the genus! 

USEFUL INFORMATION:
Family: Papaveraceae
Origin: Siberia, Northern China, Korea, and Japan
Zones: USDA Zones 3a-9b (-40 to 25° F)
Size: 24-36” x 18-24” wide
Light: Light to full shade
Soil: Average, well-drained soil, moist
Water: Average
Flowers: Pink and white flowers in April-May
Uses: Great for borders and woodland gardens
Concerns: Prefers moist soil in the summer and dry in winter. Good drainage is a must. Goes dormant by midsummer.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO KNOW YOUR BLEEDING HEART GENUS AND SPECIES?

It is very interesting how plant names change for one reason or another and it can be somewhat confusing for a gardener. Well, maybe not, because “normal” gardeners may not even pay any attention and just know this plant as a Bleeding Heart. BUT not all Bleeding Hearts are the same and you really need to understand the difference or you may wonder where your plant went after it flowers…

The Lamprocapnos spectabilis species and cultivars go dormant after they flower. There are other Bleeding Heart species and cultivars available that DO NOT go dormant.

Dicentra formosa, commonly known as the Western Bleeding Heart, has ferny leaves and grows up to 12” tall and gradually forms a clump up to 36” wide. Perennial in USDA Zones 4a-8b.

Dicentra eximia, commonly known as the Fern Leaf or Fringed Bleeding Heart, is native to the Eastern United States. They grow approximately 30” tall and form clumps about as wide.

There are others but I can’t find them right now. Anyway, the other genera and species grow differently as does the Lamprocapnos spectabilis. Dicentra species grow from a rosette. All their stems and flowers grow from this rosette. The other genera do not drow from a rosette. I can explain this much better if I could the website I found earlier… GEEZ. It was a Wikipedia article and I can’t even find it in my history. Oh, well, I will into it further later.

I haven’t tried any Bleeding Hearts here on the farm yet but they are on my wishlist. Never know what I will find…

I hope you enjoyed this page and maybe found it useful. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, I would like to hear from you. Please click on “like” if you visited this page. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. 🙂 You can check out the links below for further reading.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE
WIKIPEDIA
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN
DAVE’S GARDEN
PLANTOPEDIA
GARDENIA

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