Agrimonia parviflora-Swamp Agrimony, Harvestlice, Etc.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-28-19, #607-3.

Small-Flowered Agrimony, Harvestlice Agrimony, Swamp Agrimony, and Harvestlice

Agrimonia parviflora

ag-rih-MO-nee-uh  par-VEE-flor-uh

Agrimonia parviflora Aiton is the correct and accepted scientific name for this species of Agrimonia. It was named and described by William Aiton in Hortus Kewensis in 1789.

The genus, Agrimonia L., was named and described as such by Carl von Linnaeus in first edition of Species Plantarum in 1753. 

Plants of the World Online by Kew lists 21 accepted species of Agrimonia (as of 8-6-19 when I am writing this page). Those figured could change and I will recheck from time to time.

The genus Agrimonia is a member of the Rosaceae Family which includes 108 accepted genera (as of 8-6-19).

There are a few species of Agrimonia in Missouri, but the leaves easily distinguish Agrimonia parviflora from the others. The common name is Swamp Agrimony, Small-Flowered Agrimony, Harvestlice Agrimony, and Harvestlice. Plants of the World Online lists 21 accepted species in genus but the Wikipedia says about 15. There are seven or so species in the US with three being described on the Missouriplants.com website. Agrimonia parviflora is found in 32 states in the United States. Out of all the species, Agrimonia parviflora is considered to be the most noxious.

 

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-25-19, #606-1.

I found this plant growing near the swampy area at the northeast corner of the farm a few years ago but this is the first year I saw its flowers. Flowers are the first thing you need for when looking for a positive ID on wildflower databases (well, most of them). I was very happy when I saw flowers this year so I could make a positive ID.

The Swamp Agrimony is a very interesting plant. According to information online, they can grow from 2-around 6’ tall. They are a sturdy plant with thick, stout, hairy stems that can be green, reddish-brown, or brownish-green. The hairs on the stems can be white or light brown.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-25-19, #606-2.

As I mentioned, there are three species of Agromonia described on the Missouri Plants website, but only one with leaves like this. The leaves grow alternately along the stems and are somewhat difficult to explain. You can read information from the links below to get the technical descriptions. Once you have identified this plant, you can easily recognize it.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-25-19, #606-3.

USEFUL INFORMATION:
Family: Rosaceae
Origin: U.S. Native
Zones: USDA Zones 4a-8b + (-30-15° F)
Size: 4-6’ PLUS
Light: Sun to part shade
Soil: Prefers consistently moist soil
Water: Water regularly.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-25-19, #606-4.

Although bees and certain flower flies feed on the nectar of the flowers, most mammals avoid this plant due to its bitter taste. Certain birds use Agrimony in their nests to keep away parasites such as lice and mites because of its foul aroma and taste. Flowers give way to bur-like seed capsules that cling to the fur of animals.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-25-19, #606-5.

Even though considered a noxious plant, its burs were used by Native Americans for diarrhea and to reduce fever. The roots can be pulverized and have been used to increase red blood cell count, gastrointestinal aid, a topical treatment for skin issues, and as a dietary aid.

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-28-19, #607-4.

 

Agrimonia parviflora (Swamp Agrimony) on 7-28-19, #607-5.

I have enjoyed photographing and learning about the many wildflowers growing on the farm and other areas. I have grown over 500 different plants and most have pages listed on the right side of the blog. I am not an expert, botanist, or horticulturalist. I just like growing, photographing and writing about my experience. I rely on several websites for ID and a horticulturalist I contact if I cannot figure them out. Wildflowers can be somewhat variable from location to location, so sometimes it gets a bit confusing. If you see I have made an error, please let me know so I can correct what I have written.

I hope you found this page useful and be sure to check the links below for more information. They were written by the experts and provide much more information. If you can, I would appreciate it if you would click on the “Like” below and leave a comment. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. You can also send an email to me at thebelmontrooster@yahoo.com. I would enjoy hearing from you.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WIKIPEDIA (GENUS/SPECIES)
DAVE’S GARDEN
USDA PLANTS DATABASE
ILLINOIS WILDFLOWERS
LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER
KANSAS NATIVE PLANTS
WILDFLOWERSEARCH.ORG
PFAF (PLANTS FOR A FUTURE)
WILDFLOWERS OF THE UNITED STATES
iNATURALIST
DISCOVER LIFE
*MISSOURI PLANTS*
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