Matricaria discoidea-Pineapple Chamomile

Matricaria discoidea (Pineapple Chamomile) on 5-17-18, #443-63.

Pineapple Weed, Pineapple Chamomile, Disc Mayweed

Matricaria discoidea

mat-ri-KAR-ee-uh  dis-KOY-dee-uh

Synonyms of Matricaria discoidea: (17) (Updated on 3-29-21 from Plants of the World Online): Akylopsis suaveolens (Pursh) Lehm., Anthemis inconspicua Fisch. ex Herder, Chamomilla discoidea (DC.) J.Gay ex A.Braun, Chamomilla suaveolens (Pursh) Rydb., Chrysanthemum discodes Jess., Chrysanthemum suaveolens (Pursh) Asch., Cotula matricarioides Bong., Lepidanthus suaveolens (Pursh) Nutt., Lepidotheca suaveolens (Pursh) Nutt., Matricaria suaveolens (Pursh) Buchenau, Matricaria tanacetoides Fisch. & C.A.Mey., Pyrethrum breviradiatum Schwein. ex Nutt., Pyrethrum defloratum A.Braun, Santolina suaveolens Pursh, Tanacetum matricarioides Ledeb., Tanacetum pauciflorum DC., Tanacetum suaveolens (Pursh) Hook.

The genus, Matricaria L., was named and described as such by Carl von Linnaeus in the second volume of the first edition of Species Plantarum in 1753.

Plants of the World Online by Kew lists only five accepted species in the genus Matricaria (as of 3-29-21 when I last updated this page). The genus is a member of the plant family Asteraceae with 1,679 genera. Those numbers could change as updates are made.

Distribution map of Matricaria discoidea from Plants of the World Online. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/. Retrieved on August 23, 2020.

The above distribution map of Matricaria discoidea is from Plants of the World Online. The map for North America on the USDA Plants Database is similar and includes Nebraska.

THERE ARE SEVERAL LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE FOR FURTHER READING AND TO HELP WITH A BETTER POSITIVE ID.

Matricaria discoidea (Pineapple Chamomile) on 5-17-18, #443-64.

Matricaria discoidea is a particularly interesting species in a weird kind of way. They come up along the edges of the driveway in the gravel every year without fail and fill the air with a pineapple scent when I mow. In fact, the only place I have seen them here is in my driveway. The species is an annual that spreads by reseeding.

Matricaria discoidea (Pineapple Chamomile) on 5-17-18, #443-65.

I tried transplanting them in the flower bed but so far it hasn’t worked… They seem to prefer the gravel along the driveway. One website says, “Don’t be shy if you decide to transplant this herb. Dig one up during early spring, then stomp it into a hole with the heel of your shoe. The soil around the roots should be as tightly compressed as possible.” “The plant favors the edges of inhabited areas and likes to pop up in compacted soil.” Hmmm…

Matricaria discoidea (Pineapple Chamomile) on 5-25-19, #576-54.

The Pineapple Chamomile is a neat little plant that branches out somewhat (especially since the mower keeps pruning them). The ferny leaves grow in an alternate manner along the stems. The leaves can be elliptic to oblong-obovate in outline that are simple, double, or triple compound, deeply pinnately lobed…

Matricaria discoidea (Pineapple Chamomile) on 5-25-19, #576-55.

Each stem is topped with a flowerhead that is about 1/3″ across with many greenish-yellow disk florets and no ray florets. Each disk floret has 4 tiny lobes at its apex. The base of the flowerhead has a few overlapping green bracts that are lanceolate or ovate in shape with papery upper margins. The top of the flowerheads are shaped like domes or blunt cones.

The Matricaria discoidea attracts flower flies and is possibly what pollinated them. Personally, I don’t remember seeing flies or bees on the flowers and there are thousands of them.

I hope to be adding more photos and information about this neat little plant in 2021.

I have enjoyed photographing and learning about the many wildflowers growing on the farm and other areas. My farm is in Windsor, Missouri in Pettis County (Henry County is across the street and Benton and Johnson aren’t far away). I have grown over 500 different plants and identified over 100 species of wildflowers (most have pages listed on the right side of the page). I am not an expert, botanist, or horticulturalist. I just like growing, photographing, and writing about my experience. I rely on several websites for ID and a few horticulturalists I contact if I cannot figure them out. Wildflowers can be somewhat variable from location to location, so sometimes it gets a bit confusing. If you see I have made an error, please let me know so I can correct what I have written.

I hope you found this page useful and be sure to check the links below for more information. They were written by experts and provide much more information. Some sites may not be up-to-date but they are always a work in progress. If you can, I would appreciate it if you would click on the “Like” below and leave a comment. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. You can also send an email to me at thebelmontrooster@yahoo.com. I would enjoy hearing from you especially if you notice something is a bit whacky.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
INTERNATIONAL PLANT NAMES INDEX (GENUS/SPECIES)
TROPICOS (GENUS/SPECIES)
WORLD FLORA ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WIKIPEDIA (GENUS/SPECIES)
DAVE’S GARDEN
MISSOURI PLANTS
iNATURALIST.ORG
WILDFLOWERSEARCH.ORG
USDA PLANTS DATABASE
ILLINOIS WILDFLOWERS
MINNESOTA WILDFLOWERS
KANSAS WILDFLOWERS AND GRASSES
GO BOTANY
AWKWARD BOTANY
MONTANA HOMESTEADER
MIDWEST PERMACULTURE

NOTE: The figures may not match on these websites. It depends on when and how they make updates and when their sources make updates (and if they update their sources or even read what they say). Some websites have hundreds and even many thousands of species to keep up with. Accepted scientific names change periodically and it can be hard to keep with as well. In my opinion, Plants of the World Online by Kew is the most reliable and up-to-date plant database and they make updates on a regular basis. I make updates at least once a year and when I write new pages and add new photos but I do get behind. We are all a work in progress. 🙂

 

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