Alocasia ‘Calidora’

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-19-16, #274-3.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’

Alocasia gageana x Alocasia odora

a-loh-KAY-see-uh   gay-jee-AH-nuh   x   oh-DOR-uh

Alocasia gageana Engl. & K.Krause was first documented by Heinrich Gustav Adolf Engler and Kurt Krause in Das Plfanzenreich in 1920. It is known as the Dwarf Upright Elephant Ear. The other parent, Alocasia odora (Lindl.) K.Koch was documented by Karl Heinrich Emil Koch in Index Seminum in 1854. Alocasia odora is known as the Giant Upright Elephant Ear and has been used in the creation of many hybrids.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ was hybridized by LariAnn Gardner of Aroid Research. The progeny of this cross is highly variable and many look nothing like their parents.

In the following photographs, you will see that Alocasia ‘Calidora’ is one of the hardiest and easy to grow. I think that is attributed to its parents and their hardiness also. Alocasia ‘Calidora’ can grow to 8′ tall. Some information on the internet says they will grow in sun to part shade, but I have never had them in full sun. They are supposedly hardy in USDA Zones 8-11, but Dave’s Garden says 9b. I always move mine inside if the temps drop to close to 50 degrees F because some Alocasia can go dormant if the temps get around 45. SO, remember, these are NOT Colocasia. I do remember in Mississippi the gardens at an event center (down there somewhere) had HUGE AMAZING gardens. They had Alocasia growing that they said they overwintered in the ground, They didn’t know what species they were, but they looked a lot like A. ‘Calidora’…

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ from Wellspring Gardens on 4-15-12, #86-6. (Already in a different pot in this photo)

I bought this awesome Alocasia hybrid from Wellspring Gardens in the spring of 2012. It wasted no time growing and soon became one of the largest of my Alocasia. As it grows, it produces tuberous trunk that resembles a palm tree, which is why one of its common names is Persian Palm. Information states that Alocasia ‘Odora’ can grow 6-8 feet tall and have leaves up to 3-4 feet long and 3 feet wide…

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-3-12, #107-6.

According to the internet, this hybrid is hardy in USDA Zones 9b-11 (25 to 40 degrees F. It could be hardier though as one of its parents, Alocasia odora, is hardy down to zone 7b.

 

<<<<2013>>>>

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 5-13-13, #148-4.

When I moved back to the farm in February 2013, I took most of my Alocasia with me, including the Alocasia ‘Calidora’. It made the 8-9 hour ride in a trailer in 30 degree temps just fine. I put the Alocasia and the other plants I brought in the basement where most of them did just fine.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ with her first flower on 6-29-13, #159-1.

When warmer weather finally came, I moved three of the Alocasia outside on the north side of the house then later out by the shed where grandpa’s old garage had been. I was pretty excited when ‘Calidora’ started growing its first flower in June 2013.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ with her second flower on 7-14-13, #162-7.

Alocasia ‘Calidora continued to do very well…

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 9-10-13, #186-2.

The above photo shows the seeds from the flower of Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 9-2-13.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 9-17-13, #188-5.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ did great all summer in 2013. When cooler temps came in October I had to move my plants back to the basement. The temperature in the basement usually stays around 65 degrees F.

 

<<<<2014>>>>

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-1-14, #228-8.

Well,, we made it through the second winter in the basement. I waited a while before I took her first photo in 2014 because the Alocasia needed an adjustment period before they looked their best. I was surprised, though, at how well they went through the winter in a cool basement with not much light.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-29-14, #230-11.

By June 29, 2014, when the above photo was taken, Alocasia ‘Calidora’ was looking really good.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-12-14, #231-7.

Toward the middle of October when temps started falling again the Alocasia had to return to the basement once again for another winter.

 

<<<<2015>>>>

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 5-16-15, #255-2.

I am not 100% sure, but I think the above photo shows Alocasia ‘Calidora’ with her first baby. The Alocasia made it through the winter very well again and were very happy to get back outside in the fresh air.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-5-15, #265-4.

Even though the Alocasia do very well in the basement over the winter, they always lose a lot of leaves.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-14-15, #268-3.

The above photo shows Alocasia ‘Calidora’ with her first bud of 2015.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-27-15, #270-2.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ wastes no time growing!

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-12-15, #271-1.

By July 12, 2015, Alocasia ‘Calidora’ was looking AWESOME!

 

<<<<2016>>>>

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-19-16, #274-3.

MY, how she has grown!

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-19-16, #274-4.

The above photo is her kid…

As the cooler weather started approaching, the Alocasia and other potted plants once again had to be moved to the house…

 

<<<<2017>>>>

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-18-17, #345-4.

Well, Alocasia ‘Calidora made it through another winter. Her babies are growing and soon I will need to remove them and put them in pots of their own. One thing good about A. ‘Calidora’ is that she doesn’t seem to produce as many offspring.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 6-24-17, #349-5.

Still growing!

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-11-17, #356-2.

Look at all those orbs!!!

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 7-11-17, #356-3.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ with her first flower of 2017.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 8-11-17, #365-1.

OK, it is high time I remove those babies!

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 8-23-17, #368-1.

ON August 23 I decided to remove the two babies in the big Alocasia ‘Calidora’ pot. I need to remove them before they get this big…

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 8-23-17, #368-24.

Here are the two babies in their own pots. If you want to read the post I made when I did this, click on the link below:

Removing/Repotting Alocasia Round 1…

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 8-29-17, #369-4.

I put the brick in the pot after I removed the babies because she was leaning a little.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ leaf on 8-20-17, #369-5.

A good look at the underside of an Alocasia ‘Calidora’ leaf.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ leaf on 8-29-17, #369-6.

The photo above is a closer look at the petiole where it attaches to the leaf. Much different than those on the Colocasia, which is why Alocasia leaves stand upright.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 8-29-17, #369-8.

The above photo shows the bottom part of the, um… whatever you call it. Not called a stem, though. As petioles grow and die this part gets bigger and higher. Now you can clearly see why the common name of Alocasia ‘Calidora’ is Persian Palm because it kind of looks like the base of a palm.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ on 10-11-17, #382-6.

Temperatures were beginning to cool off when the above photo was taken on October 10. Soon I would be moving the plants inside for the winter.

 

The Alocasia inside for the winter on 10-16-17, #384-1.

I moved the plants inside for the winter on October 16 where the Alocasia would remain in the basement over the winter. It always amazed me how well they do there.

 

<<<<2018>>>>

Group of Alocasia in the basement on 1-12-18, #397-2.

Still waiting patiently for warm weather, the Alocasia are doing well. The tallest in the back is the Alocasia ‘Calidora’.

 

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ flower on 7-29-18, #487-6.

Alocasia ‘Calidora’ is doing very well and remains the tallest of the three cultivars I am still growing (plus Alocasia gageana). The tallest pot blew over and it must have been a couple of days before I saw it. Its petioles and leaves had already grown crooked and didn’t look very well for a while. That’s why I haven’t taken and new photos of it… I will soon be updating this page as well as the other Alocasia with new photos.

The Alocasia parent page has more information and links about Alocasia and photos of the plants I have grown. I also have a separate page for each one.

I have enjoyed growing this hybrid and I highly recommend it. The page will continue growing and I will be adding more photos as time goes by.

I hope you enjoyed this page and maybe found it useful. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, I would like to hear from you. Please click on “like” if you visited this page. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. 🙂 You can check out the links below for further reading. The links take you directly to the genus and species of this plant.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE
DAVE’S GARDEN
THE NATIONAL GARDENING ASSOCIATION
LOUIS THE PLANT GEEK

Please leave a comment. I would like to hear from you.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.