Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket)

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-17.

Dame’s Rocket, Dame’s Violet, Sweet Rocket, Wandering Lady

Hesperis matronalis

HES-per-iss  mah-tro-NAH-lis

Synonyms for Hesperis matronalisAntoniana sylvestris Bubani, Crucifera matronalis E.H.L.Krause, Deilosma inodorum Fuss, Deilosma niveum Fuss, Deilosma runcinatum Fuss, Deilosma sibirica Andrz. ex DC., Hesperis adzharica Tzvelev, Hesperis albiflora Schur, Hesperis bituminosa Willd., Hesperis caucasica Rupr., Hesperis euganea Marsili ex Ten., Hesperis heterophylla Ten., Hesperis hortensis Pers. ex Steud., Hesperis meyeriana (Trautv.) N.Busch, Hesperis oblongipetala Borbás, Hesperis oreophila Kitag., Hesperis pontica Zapal., Hesperis pycnotricha Borbás & Degen, Hesperis sabauda Rouy & Foucaud, Hesperis sibirica Hohen. ex Boiss., Hesperis theophrasti subsp. graeca F.Dvorák, Hesperis transcaucasica Tzvelev, Hesperis umbrosa Herbich, Hesperis unguinosa Schrank, Hesperis verna Pall. ex Ledeb., Hesperis voronovii N.Busch

Hesperis matronalis L. is the correct and accepted scientific name for Dame’s Rocket (ETC.). The genus and species were named and described as such by Carl von Linnaeus in the second volume of the first edition of Species Plantarum in 1753.

Plants of the World Online lists 45 species in the Hesperis genus (as of 5-18-20 when I am updating this page). It is a member of the Brassicaceae Family with a total of 346 genera. Those numbers could change periodically as updates are made.

Distribution map of Hesperis matronalis from Plants of the World Online. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet; http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/. Retrieved on May 18, 2020.

The above distribution map for Hesperis matronalis is from Plants of the World Online. Areas in green are where the species is native and purple where it has been introduced. The map on the USDA Plants Database for North America is similar and also includes Alaska.

There are several pages at the bottom of the page for further reading and to help with a better positive ID.

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-18.

Hesperis matronalis is another plant with a mistaken identity. One evening toward the end of April I noticed what appeared to be a Phlox divaricata flowering in the area north of the chicken house where they have not been before. There is quite a large colony of them growing along the road up the street past the church which I also always assumed were Phlox. The Wild Blue Phlox (in the last post) grows abundantly in large colonies along highways and back roads in several areas. I decided to take photos of the plant and noticed right off it WAS NOT a Phlox divaricata. Hmmm…

I will add more ID information later. I have a lot of wildflower pages to add and need to get them on this site. The links below will give you additional and very good information about Hesperis matronalis.

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-19.

Phlox divaricata has flowers with five petals and this one only has four… They have a pleasant scent which gets stronger in the evening. Hesperis matronalis is a biennial or short-lived perennial that comes up and forms a rosette of leaves its first year and flowers the second.

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-20.

 

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-21.

 

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-22.

The other distinguishing feature for Hesperis matronalis is the leaves. Phlox leaves grow opposite one another on the stems and Hesperis leaves grow in an alternate fashion. The leaves have no petioles and darn near clasp the stems.

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-23.

 

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-3-20, #695-24.

 

 

Hesperis matronalis (Dame’s Rocket) on 5-8-20, #696-1.

Hesperis matronalis is a native of many Eurasian countries and was apparently brought to North America in the 17th century. The USDA Plants Database shows its presence in most of North America now. Common names include Dame’s Rocket, Dame’s Violet, Sweet Rocket, and Wandering Lady. Many states have listed this species as a noxious weed and it is recommended not to move it or grow it under conditions that would involve danger of dissemination. Hmmm… Seed is available and wildflower mixes often contain its seeds which helped its spread in the first place.

I have enjoyed photographing and learning about the many wildflowers growing on the farm and other areas. My farm is in Windsor, Missouri in Pettis County (Henry County is across the street and Benton and Johnson aren’t far away). I have grown over 500 different plants and most have pages listed on the right side of the blog. I am not an expert, botanist, or horticulturalist. I just like growing, photographing and writing about my experience. I rely on several websites for ID and a horticulturalist I contact if I cannot figure them out. Wildflowers can be somewhat variable from location to location, so sometimes it gets a bit confusing. If you see I have made an error, please let me know so I can correct what I have written.

I hope you found this page useful and be sure to check the links below for more information. They were written by experts and provide much more information. Some sites may not be up-to-date but they are always a work in progress. If you can, I would appreciate it if you would click on the “Like” below and leave a comment. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. You can also send an email to me at thebelmontrooster@yahoo.com. I would enjoy hearing from you especially if you notice something is a bit whacky

NOTE: Plants of the World Online is the most up-to-date database. It is very hard for some to keep with name changes these days so you may find a few discrepancies between the websites. Just be patient. Hopefully, someday they will be in harmony. 🙂

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WORLD FLORA ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WIKIPEDIA (GENUS/SPECIES)
USDA PLANTS DATABASE
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN
MISSOURI PLANTS
MSU-MIDWEST WEEDS AND WILDFLOWERS
iNATURALIST
WILDFLOWERSEARCH.ORG
DAVE’S GARDEN
ILLINOIS WILDFLOWERS
MINNESOTA WILDFLOWERS
KANSAS WILDFLOWERS AND GRASSES
FRIENDS OF THE WILDFLOWER GARDEN
PFAF (PLANTS FOR A FUTURE)
GO BOTANY
FLORA FINDER
INVASIVE PLANT ATLAS
INVASIVE.ORG
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