Sempervivum arachnoideum ‘Cebenese’-Cobweb Houseleek

Sempervivum arachnoideum  ‘Cebenese’ on 6-1-14, #228-75.

Cobweb Houseleek

Sempervivum arachnoideum ‘Cebenese’

sem-per-VEE-vum  a-rak-NOY-dee-um

ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY AWARD OF GARDEN MERIT

Synonyms of Sedum arachnoideum (7) (Updated on 2-21-21): Sedum arachnoideum E.H.L.Krause, Sempervivum × barbulatum subsp. etruscum D.Donati & G.Dumont, Sempervivum doellianum C.B.Lehm., Sempervivum hausmannii Nyman, Sempervivum heterotrichum Schott, Sempervivum moggridgei De Smet ex Hook.f., Sempervivum sanguineum Jeanb. ex Timb.-Lagr.

Sempervivum arachnoideum L. is the correct and accepted scientific name for this species of Sempervivum. The genus and species were named and described as such by Carl von Linnaeus in the first volume of the first edition of Species Plantarum in 1753. I am not sure if he was actually the first to name either one, though… 

The cultivar was registered in 1980 and introduced by Helen E. Payne.

Plants of the World Online by Kew lists 51 species in the Sempervivum genus (as of 2-21-21 when I last updated this page). it is a member of the plant family Crassulaceae with 26 genera. Those numbers could change as updates are made (and likely will).

THERE ARE A FEW LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE FOR FURTHER READING.

Sempervivum arachnoideum ‘Cebenese’ on 6-29-14, #230-79.

Sempervivum arachnoideum is native to the Pyrenees, Alps, Apennines, and Carpathian mountains in Europe. The species is quite variable, including dwarf and crested forms, which all hybridize easily.

The species is unique in that the leaf tips are connected with webbing that resembles cobwebs. There are several cultivars available and the degree of webbing varies. There are also red and maroon types.

USEFUL INFORMATION:
Family: Crassulaceae.
Origin: Mountains of Europe.
Zones: USDA Zones 4a-9b (-30 to 25° F).*
Size: 2 1/3 to 4” tall.
Light: Sun to part shade.
Soil: Well-drained.
Water: Average during the growing period, dryer during the winter months.

*Dave’s Garden says down to 3a but that is probably with good protection. Sempervivum can be tricky in some areas. I have tried several and so far only Sempervivum x ‘Killer’ has done well overwintering outside. Sempervivum  ‘Oddity’ has done well overwintering in the basement over the winter but eventually bit the dust. I tried a few more times. I have had six different Sempervivum cultivars since 2013…

Flowers of this species are normally pink, but there are also white and red variations. Flowers are held above the leaves on a 6-7” stems. Once the plant flowers and sets seed it will die. Hopefully there will be plenty offsets.

There are many Sempervivum species that tolerate cold better than others. They particularly dislike cold, wet winters and that is somewhat difficult to remedy in some areas. The webbing of this particular species will catch and hold water which could make rotting an issue. 

Sempervivum are easy to grow in elevated beds and pots which allows water to drain much better. Sunny spots are favored but in hot climates they may need a shadier spot because they are not that heat tolerant. 

I am not sure what did my Sempervivum arachnoideum in, but I think I tried to overwinter it in a pot inside and others in the ground. Either way, neither attempt was successful. Maybe someday I will run across another pot and give them another shot. How has your experience been with this species?

I hope you enjoyed this page and maybe found it useful. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, I would like to hear from you. Please click on “like” if you visited this page. It helps us bloggers stay motivated. 🙂 You can check out the links below for further reading. The links take you directly to the genus and species of this plant.

FOR FURTHER READING:
PLANTS OF THE WORLD ONLINE (GENUS/SPECIES)
WIKIPEDIA (GENUS/SPECIES)
LLIFLE (ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIVING FORMS)
DAVE’S GARDEN
THE NATIONAL GARDENING ASSOCIATION
ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY
SUCCULENTGUIDE
INTERNATIONAL CRASSULACEAE NETWORK

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